High praise from Kirkus for SPSBT

“The author’s use of business statistics and bullet-pointed lists of his own lessons learned are enlightening and frequently surprising and moves much of his pro-entrepreneurship slant from conventional wisdom into fact-based guidance for the “young, hungry talent” he hopes will help rebuild the American economy.

A galvanizing amalgam of personal history, acquired business wisdom and mentorship.”

Read more of the Kirkus review here: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/andrew-yang/smart-people-should-build-things/

The Prestige Pathways (Excerpt 2)

Let’s imagine a very large company. It is a leader in its industry and much admired by its peers. It invests a tremendous amount of money—literally billions of dollars a year—in identifying, screening, and training its many employees. Those employees who are considered to have high potential are sent to special training programs at substantial additional cost. Happily, these top training programs are considered to be among the best in the world. After these employees complete their training, the company encourages them to choose for themselves the division in which they’d like to work. Employee preferences are deemed to be the most efficient way of deciding who works where. Continue reading

Postgraduate Pursuits of National University Graduates

(research done for 2008 – 2013)

Finance Consulting Law Medicine Teach for America Grad School
Harvard 11–17% 7–11% 12–17% 12–16% 4% 8–9%
Yale 10.5–19% 4–14% 15–20% 9–12% 3% 7%
Princeton 22–25% 14–18% 10–15% 9–12% 2% 7–9%
Penn 20–21% 12–13% 11–15% 9–12% 2% 11%
MIT 9–10% 9–10% 1% 7–10% .6% 29%
Stanford 15% 15% 8–11% 12–16% 2%
Duke 15–16% 12–14% 12–16% 15–19% 2–3% 4–7%
Brown 8–10% 5–6% 8–12% 10–14% 3% 13–14%
Dartmouth 6 –19% 6–12% 12–16% 10–14% 3–4% 3–7%
Cornell 12.3% 7.1% 8–12% 9–13% 1% 20%
Columbia 11–15% 6% 7–10% 7–9% 2% 10–13%
Johns Hopkins 6% 6% 5–8% 18–23% 2% 25%
University of Chicago 7–10% 5–10% 12–15% 6–10% 2% 14–19%
Georgetown 13–16% 7–13% 14–17% 5–8% 3% 11%
Average 13.5% 9.7% 15.5% 10.9% 2.3% 13.2%

Sources:

Smart People Should Build Things (Excerpt 1)

Take me, for instance. I wasn’t very enterprising when I graduated from Brown in 1996. I had a general desire to be smart, accomplished, and successful—whatever that meant. So I went to law school and became a corporate attorney in New York. I figured out I was in the wrong place after a number of months working at the law firm. I left in less than a year Continue reading